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Music Students Perform on Armstrong Stage for Honors Recital

EDMOND—More than 70 music students from Herbert W. Armstrong College and Imperial Academy performed on the Armstrong Auditorium stage on January 14 for family, friends and guests from the Philadelphia Church of God congregation to share their progress in the schools’ music program.

The two-hour recital included performances by the Armstrong Youth Orchestra, the Armstrong Youth Chorus, the Imperial Choraliers and the Armstrong Youth Sinfonia, as well as 16 performances by music students taking private lessons from 12 instructors.

The Armstrong Youth Sinfonia opened the recital with “Come Thou Almighty King” by Felice Giardini and “Tomorrow’s Light,” by Brian Byrne and Ryan Malone, a piece from the Church’s Celtic Throne Irish dance production. The two pieces were conducted by Mr. Malone, the Church’s music director, and were performed with four violins, two trumpets, one cello and one oboe.

Soloist Ezekiel Malone then played Violin Concerto No. 3 in B Minor by Camille Saint-Saens, accompanied by the Armstrong Youth Orchestra. The orchestra also performed March Militaire by Franz Schubert featuring a high-school senior trumpet duet by Zachary Williams and Aaron Eagle.

The rest of the hour consisted of 11 pieces, including solos on the flute, harp, piano, violin and cello. After intermission, the Imperial Choraliers sang One Voice by Barry Manilow and Consider Yourself by Lionel Bart. Five soloists followed singing pieces by George F. Handel, Wolfgang A. Mozart, Giacomo Puccini, Andrew Lippa and Georges Bizet. The recital concluded with four pieces by the Armstrong Youth Chorus, which sang Chindia by Alexandru Pascanu, Le Baylère arranged by Goff Richards, Blessed Be the Name of the Lord by Dale Grotenhuis and Good Night, Dear Heart by Douglas Forrest.

Performers said it was “exciting” to not only sing and play but also to see the changes in mood of the audience, as the music changed. One young performer said it was a “fun way to share our talents with family and friends.”